Città di Castello

Church of Saints Florido and Amanzio in Città di Castello

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The Città di Castello Cathedral, dedicated to the city's patron saints Florido and Amanzio, stands in the heart of the city, on piazza Gabriotti

In the bottom section of the baroque façade, there is a large staircase and a series of pilasters, columns and niches, which together give an impression of great plasticity. Nearby is the imposing circular Romanesque bell tower, in the Ravenna style.

The inside of the church, with its Latin cross layout, is a single nave with side chapels and a panelled design redolent of the 17th century.  The side chapels, erected on the orders of the castle's most important families in the 16th and 17th centuries, feature a wealth of frescoes and paintings on canvas.  Among these, the Santissimo Sacramento, known as the 'Great Chapel', deserves particular attention; the panel depicting The Glory of Christ (1528-30) by Rosso Fiorentino used to be here, and is now kept in the nearby Cathedral Museum.  Among the many works preserved inside the church are the paintings of Bernardino Gagliardi, the frescoes of Tommaso Conca, Saint Paul's fall from a Horse, painted by Niccolò Circignani, known as Il Pomarancio, as well as a wooden choir stall carved and inlaid in 1540.
Under the Cathedral is the Lower church, subdivided into two naves of thick pillars that support cross vaults.  The relics of Saints Florido and Amanzio are kept here. According to tradition, the cathedral was founded in the 6th century by Saint Florido, although the original structure dates back to the 11th century.

Over the centuries the church has undergone many important restorations:   it was enlarged in 1356; between 1466 and 1529 it was completely renovated following plans by Elia di Bartolomeo, his son Tommaso and Piero di Lombardia, who adapted the church to the new architectural forms of the Renaissance.  Lastly, in 1632, following designs by Francesco Lazzari, the facade was rebuilt, although the upper section remained incomplete.